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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
and a with scott miller. >> david axe was imbedded with the u.s. army in afghanistan. it is his fourth visit to the country. he spent time with the 4th airbourne, patrolling in remote areas and engaging the security situation. obama announced a plan to bring 10,000 troops home from afghanistan by the end of the year. >> it depends on where you are. my experience is in the east. i have a little experience in the south. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have strong relationships with kabul, with a lot of traffic. today, these are what i call, bombing galleries, where the coalition troops and a large coalition presence is trying very hard to like this town in order to protect this. but every step that they take, they are threatened. thousands every year, that are killing hundreds of native troops, and many times the number of afghans. as we move closer to the border, and you had se, the threat will change. this is not so much ied's because there is less vehicle traffic. the coaliti
of afghanistan, its abilities to reestablish the safe haven. in other words, we in to render the heart of al qaeda and capable of launching attacks on our homeland, citizens, our allies, as well as preventing this group and its affiliates and adherents from doing so. at the same time, hopefully a kid and means to address the serious threat posed by the -- this does not require a global war. it does require a focus on specific regions, including what we might call the periphery, places like yemen, somalia, iraq -- it is another important distinguishing factor. it has looked increasingly to other groups and individuals to take a because, including the gold strike and the united states. we a specific and focus counter- terrorism and objectives. we're protecting our home and by constantly reducing our vulnerability is and not acting -- and adapting our abilities. we're the greatest al qaeda's capabilities and disrupting its operation. we're degrading the capability of al qaeda senior leadership to inspire, to nicki with, and direct the operations of its adherents from the world. we are aggressiv
the corridor's hall of power. afghanistan, if we listen to president obama during the campaign and are said progressive need to be as tough and pragmatic about president obama as he is about us. he spoke about afghanistan as a good work and he needed to show because of the national security state gregoire politics till we find a way to end that the president remained captive to that. he had to show he was tough. i think what is going on is you have the ability on a number of core issues, one of them is afghanistan, corporate power is another, transpartisan majority who want a way out of afghanistan, believe corporate power is strong in this country and a president with leadership could seize that and find a way to build politics around that. thinking of president johnson, wars kill reform presidencies. and president obama, he is a reform, too ltd. but in these areas he is a reform president. it is imperative for citizens, progress of, citizens of conscience to organize more independently and find ways to drive those issues into the next election but more generally build coalitions that will
and afghanistan. it will serve as an insurance policy for the future interactions between afghanistan and the united states. host: what is your country doing currently to prepare for the pullout of the 33,000 troops by 2014? guest: we have made a plann. we have areas already identified from different parts of the country where our security forces will take full responsibility for security while the international coalition forces will gradually pulled u back. other elements for securing various will develop and surge. to get the heart and mind of the people, we should deliver basic services based on their needs. we should have projects in those areas. meanwhile, we should work with communities directly on things they need based on the properties that our government should deliver it to them. host: which area is the most dangerous and poses the most challenges for the security forces? guest: the seven areas are chosen carefully in different parts of the country. those areas are quite calm right now. there's not much challenge as far as security is concerned. we will see when we start th
represented inside the halls corridor of power. afghanistan, you know, if we listened to president obama during the campaign, and i was one who said that,ing you know, progressives need to be tough and pragmatic about president obama as he is about us, he spoke about afghanistan as the good war, and he did that because he needed to show because of the national security state grip on our politics, until we find a way to end that, a president remains captive to a large extent. he had to show he was tough. i think now what's going on in this country is you have the ability, polls are snapshots, but on a number of core issues, afghanistan, corporate powers and others, there's majorities of people who want a way out of afghanistan, who believe corporate power is too strong in this country, and a president with leadership could seize that. it's not too late, and find a way to build politics around that. thinking of president johnson, wars kill, reform presidencies. president obama is a reform, maybe deluded, too limited, but in these areas, a reform president. it's imperative now for citizens,
rodriguez says he doesn't expect violence in afghanistan to start decreasing until next year. from the pentagon earlier today, this is 45 minutes. >> general rodriguez, it's counselor dave lapin at the pentagon. if you're ready to go, i'll introduce you and we'll get started. >> ok, dave, go ahead, thanks. >> thank you. good morning to those here, good evening in afghanistan. i'd like to welcome pack to the pentagon briefing room, army lieutenant general david rodriguez. he's commander of the international security assistance force joint command, also known as i.j.c. and also the deputy commander of the united states forces afghanistan. general rodriguez's current tour began in june, 2009, he became the first commander of the i.j.c. in october of that year. prior to that, general rodriguez was commander of regional command east for 15 months from january, 2007 to april, 2008. next week after two straight years in command and more than 40 months in after gap stan over the past 4 1/2 year, general rodriguez is ski wruled to change command and return stateside to have u.s. army forces
to debate the timing of our military drawdown in afghanistan. my belief is that the general's voice should carry the most weight. what is wrong as for the republican party to shrink from the challenges of american leadership in the world. history repeatedly warns us that in the long run, weakest and foreign policy cost us and our children much more than we will ever say in the budget -- saved in the budget line item. america has one political party devoted to decline and withdrawal it doesn't need a second one. our enemies respect and respond to strength. sometimes strength means military intervention. sometimes it means diplomatic pressure. that always means moral clarity in word and deed. that is the legacy of republican foreign policy at its best in our next republican president must carry the banner around the world. of equality and opportunity for all citizens, it remains a dream for people in the middle east and around the world. as america stands for these principles and stands with our friends and allies, the middle east will transform this moment of turbulence into a more lasting
will receive it for courageous actions in afghanistan 2008 he is only the second living active duty soldier to get the award he will be awarded in the east room of the white house in front of his wife and other family members. >>> another big story private funeral service held in california for former first lady betty ford she will be remembered at st. margaret's church in palm dessert among those a-- desert. today's service is invitation only but will be televised following the funeral the public is invited to file past mrs. ford's casket and sign a guest book until midnight. >>> some other top stories montgomery county council taking up a proposed curfew for teens 18 and younger the bill would impose an 11:00 p.m. curfew sunday through thursday nights and 12:01 a.m. curfew on the weekends, minors will be barred from public places in the county until 5:00 a.m. the next morning parents could be held responsible for allowing children to violate that curfew. >> montgomery county council expected to discuss a proposed smoking ban today pertains to indoor common areas, multifamily dwellings, ha
and done, iraq and afghanistan will suck the treasury dry to the tune of at least $3.7 trillion. enough already. mr. chairman, the pentagon is like that teenager. you keep giving the kid the keys to the car and he keeps crashing it. it's time we cut him off. we must draw the line and we must draw it here. no more money for libya. no more continuance in libyan hostilities. i urge my colleagues, support this amendment. i yield back. the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise? >> i move to strike the last word. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. poe: the gentleman says we have gone to war in the name of humanity. in other words, the president's war in libya is so that we can preserve humanity in libya. in the history of peoples, as the gentleman from california has pointed out, in the histories of countries, it has always been the king, the dictator, the tyrant, the chief, the leader that has sent that particular country to war. so when our ancestors got together and they formed a new and perfect union, they decided it would not be the leader,
about nation building, failed states, afghanistan, iraq, somalia, iraq, haiti, the foreign policy challenges that we've faced weapon have the illusion which i would call the problem of getting to denmark. denmark is in quotations. it's not a real country. it's the mythical place that have low corruption, democracy, stable government, good services delivered very efficiently and so forth. we have the vision of denmark in the back of our heads and go to a place like afghanistan. how are we going to get afghanistan to look like denmark? and it doesn't work very well. and part of the reason that i began to realize was that we don't understand how denmark got to be denmark. i had a visiting professorship, so i've been going. most danes have no idea how denmark got to be denmark. it struck me as a political scientist, this ought to be a book you can go to to say where did political institutions come from. i didn't see one. so i decided to write it. that's why we get the book that i've produced. so i also did not want to write a book on the origins of politics that told this traditional
university professor. after this break, we will talk more politics and legislation and afghanistan with our roundtable, conn carroll and jamelle bouie. be right back. ♪ >> monday on c-span, the dali lama -- dalai lama and martin luther king, jr.'s speechwriter. they spoke about a number of topics, including the death penalty. >> the number of people who kill through violence -- are killed through violence, over 200 million. but problem not solved. i think that people lay down a seed of hatred. >> watch this discussion monday at 6:30 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> monday night on c-span, look back at president nixon's foreign policy. members of his administration and the president's son-in-law discuss topics including communism in china, invading north vietnam, and the 1967 war in the middle east. >> the discussion then in the newspapers were nixon's secret plan for peace. what was it? of course, he never talked about it. that was rockefeller pushing nixon to say something, to expose what his plan was. rockefeller did not think that nixon had a plan. he comes in after a hard day of campaigning
at the white house. >> heather: defense secretary leon panetta traveling to afghanistan. he says that the u.s. is targeting up to 20 key leaders of the al-qaeda based on information gathered during that raid on osama bin laden's compound in pakistan and terror group is now within reach. david is live from kabul, afghanistan. >> reporter: the duly appointed defense secretary arrived here a few hours ago to find out for himself the situation on the ground here. he has brief talks with military officials including david petraeus and then he went straight into a meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai. their discussions included the transition of nato held areas of afghan control starting in july but also the drawdown of u.s. troops over the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can
of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: this was a deadly day for nato forces in afghanistan. the alliance announced four troops were killed in two separate attacks in the east. there was no immediate word on their nationalities. 280 nato service members have died in afghanistan so far this year. in syria, security forces and allied gunmen shot and killed 11 people in hama, where residents openly defied the regime of bashar al-assad. activists reported hundreds of people burned tires and erected makeshift barriers to block troops and tanks now encircling the city. in washington, state department spokesman victoria nuland said it is the latest evidence that syria is using "intimidation and arrest" to erase all opposition. >> a week ago the positive example of a city in syria where peaceful demonstrations were allowed, where people were meeting each other and organizing and talking. today we see the town surrounded by syrian security forces so we're going in the wrong direction. >> sreenivasan: in 1982, then- president hafez assad, the current leader's father, crushed a rebelli
for you. >>> canada pulled the last of the combat troops out of afghanistan this week. this brings us to our question of the week. how many nations still have combat troops in afghanistan as part of the international security assistance force? is it a, 6, b, 16, c, 26 or d 46. stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. go to cnn.com/gps for ten more questions. while you're there, make sure you check out our website, the global public square where you'll find smart interviews and essays and takes by our favorite experts. you will also find all of our gps shows. if you miss one, you can click and watch. don't forget, you can follow us on twitter and facebook. this week's book of the week is the last narco. it takes you deep inside the life of a man known as elchapo now that bin laden is dead, this mexican drug king pin is the number one most wanted man in the world. he's also on forbes list of the world top billionaires, it's a fascinating look at the man, the operation and international hunt for him. very well written. and now for the last look. we often think our politicians ar
insurance. >>> can a day pulled the last of its troops out of afghanistan this week. that brings us to our question of the week -- how many nations still have combat troops in afghanistan as part of the international security assist tansz force? is it 6, 16, 26 or 46? stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. make sure you go to cnn.com/gps for ten more question and make sure you check out the global public square don't forget, you can also follow us on twitter and facebook. this week's "book of the week" is the "the last narco." it takes you deep into the life. now that bin laden is dead, this mexican drug kingpin is the number one most ban wanted man in the world, also on "forbes" list of the world's top billionaires. it's a fascinating look at the man. very well written. >>> we often think or politicians are always bickering. it might make you feel better to look at the case of australia, where it seems lawmakers have been literally been fighting like cats and dogs. listen to this. >> if i can finish now. >> why don't you meow when a woman does that. >> yes. what you hear there
challenge to the military will leave afghanistan and iraq around the world the budget challenges that face the country. in little over a month, we will mark the tenth anniversary of 9/11. we will honor the victims of that day including 184 people who were tragically taken out by the attack on this very building. and we will renew our commitment to america's dern ability to remain vigilant to these old and new threats that we face, and we are going to redouble with your leadership our efforts to disrupt and feet the terrorists who continue to plot against the united states adding to the great work you have done over the agency. and we will express the american people's appreciation for our armed services, and i might add, and all of you know this who wear a uniform, and your family. the families of the 9/11 generation -- and it's hard to think about it, at least for me, from 9/11, we are, you know, we are ten years away from that day. a lot of these kids were 12 to 15 and under at the time the attack took place and the stepped up this younger generation stepped up to the fact of not just th
. we can't expect america with all its economic and other problems and with afghanistan to pull our chestnuts out of the fire. >> rose: but on the question of nato, secretary gates suggested as much. >> rose: indeed. indeed. witness again, you know, a few weeks of military action on a very small scale in libya... >> rose: and all of a sudden... >> and we're running out of munitions and turning back to the united states as the land of last rest. but look, frankly, the military action in libya which i supported, reluctantly but i supported, i actually a sideshow. the big question is can you turn egypt which had been historically at the heart of islamic culture and scholarship into a model and a beacon for threst of the arab world in. >> rose: and your answer is likely? unlikely? too soon to tell? >> look, i mean, there's amaze pog ten nshl egypt and then a highly educated young people, a strong middle-class, a great sense of history and tradition. but it could all go pear shaped between armyn the one hand which is now proving an unam big rouse friend of liberal democracy and the musli
in iraq, afghanistan, and elsewhere. what we need to do is have a growth agenda. we need to reprioritize. so instead of subsidizing off-shore jobs, we are subsidizing the growth of manufacturing here in the united states. let me make my second point. this is what the is about. republicans put a bill on the floor that they call cut, cap, and balance. i called it cut, cap, balance, wink, and nod. it absolutely wasn't real. if you just lost your job, because it was out sourced. if you are the c.e.o., you made the million dollars, you get a $100,000 check in the mail tax cut. how is that fair? backbone of the american economy. and the bill on the floor was a kick to the stomach. we need solutions defend middle class than those who provide tax holes for the middle class. host: i want to ask about yesterday what was provided for the public? guest: if you were an auto broker, yeah, it was a good deal. but going into that deal, most was recouped. at the end of the process, yes, over $1 billion, if you are an auto worker, and you are checked your job, and we have a job analysis in the united stat
trove of documents that have been released in the last year. the iraq war logs, the afghanistan war logs, and what has been called cablegate, as the u.s. state department documents that are continuing to be released. why does it matter so much? we will talk about that this afternoon, but let's just take one example that came out in the iraq war logs. february 2007. the war log show that to give you zero men were standing, iraqis under an apache helicopter. the men have their hands up. they clearly are attempting to surrender. the apache helicopter can see this. so they are not wrote. the soldiers called back to the base and asked what they should do. the lawyer in the bass says you cannot surrender to a helicopter, and they blow the man attempting to surrender away. that was february 2007. now, we will fast forward to july 12, 2007. video that has been released by wikileaks. this devastating video of an area of baghdad where a group of men were showing around two reuters journalists. one was an up-and-coming videographer, and one was this driver. he was 40 years old, father of four. they
'm not a warmonger i don't want another war. we are already tied up in iraq, afghanistan and for some reason libya. but the only way to stop iran is with clear military force. sanctions are great but at the end of the day they are not going to work. at the end of the day iranian regime is motivated by, again, an ideology. it's a messianic ideology. they truly believe and they will shape policy around this, the iranian government truly believe that they can punish in the end times. >> host: this would be the 12th? >> guest: that goes by various names. he is the islamist must live. this all sounds crazy i know but they really believe this. the likes of ahmadinejad. they believe that if they strike out against israel, if they acquire nuclear weapons, if there's a ton of great global chaos and a people which are seeing right now with this arab spring, they believe that can hasten the return of the islamist messiah who believed lead them to victory over israel and the west. so acquiring nuclear weapons is part of that divine plan. nothing will deter them or dissuade them from this goal. they believe it
the caller is right certainly in the case of pakistan and afghanistan. the united states lost sight of the importance of the region after the soviet the feet. certainly, i would hope there would be a sustained engagement that would be based on mutual respect and upon the principles that we mentioned earlier. with regards to what he mentioned about dealings in pakistan and elsewhere towards the united states, people in the middle east largely very much admire the united states for its educational institutions, the level of economic development, the basic rule of law, and so on. they were to come here, a study here, emigrate here, but there critical of some american policies. that is really the issue. we know what those policies are. host: last couple of calls. bloomington, illinois. caller: first of all, i just want to respond to the caller that the military saved muslims in southeast europe in kosovo. here is my question regarding europe. are there any elements in the arab spring in north africa that wants to integrate with europe? maybe in the future join the european union? at one
afghanistan. he didn't listen to general petraeus. he didn't listen to admiral mullen. they have again on record as saying it was more aggressive than they thought. common sense says, you don't reduce your force by a third and announce it to your enemy in order to fulfill some political promise. what kind of foreign experience do you need to listen to your experts in order to be able to make the right decision? >> sean: you came under fire early in the campaign. i never saw you mad before. you got sick and tired of answering the question about muslims in your administration. >> yes. >> sean: a reporter asked you again and you off on him a little. tell us your real position and what happened? >> throughout my business career i've always hired the best people, irrespective of race, irrespective of relidge john of sexual orientation, irrespective of ethnicity. i've always done that. i have an a record of that. i've never not hired somebody based on some discriminatory factor. what i've asked is are you commit today the mission of the company? in this case are you committed to the mission
to pakistani scholars. i am pleased to see maybe one of those scholars re-ask con whose new book on afghanistan was written while he was a scholar is with us today. rh a program has undertaken an extensive review of the economics assistance program and we will roll out the conclusions of that later this year. the house foreign affairs committee yesterday, sand that means walled off running for economic assistance and military assistance to pakistan until the president certifies that the area has adequate cooperation on counterterrorism. that is just one house committee but that is a move that some feel including me may go in the wrong direction, economic assistance i would argue is absolutely crucial. president musharraf's speech this morning comes in a timely moment. relations between our two countries are more strained today than at any time in the past 10 years. eight of our countries needs the other for the achievement of important strategic object this. yet most of the public discussion of the bilateral relationship focuses on our divisions and are as agreements. perhaps a day's session wi
. >> reporter: that's what timberlake told his co-star after a male marine in afghanist afghanistan tilted his shades and asked mila out. >> i want to take a moment out of my day to invite you on november 18th in north carolina with yours truly. take a second, think about it, get back to me. >> reporter: chances are the last time mila was asked out on a semimanufacture blind date is when cnn wolf blitzer invited her to the white house correspondents dinner and wolf is more famous than sergeant scott moore, the sergeant has justin timberlake on his side during a fox news interview. >> this needs to go down. this needs to happen. do it for your country. >> okay. i'll do it for you. >> reporter: do you do it for your country, justin timberlake, because now this marine wants you. >> justin, want to call out my girl mila, well i'm going to call you out and ask you to come to marine corps ball with me on november 12th in washington, d.c. >> reporter: kelsey is the only female marine at the martial arts center for excellence. she's an instructor with a black belt who sometimes does cage fights. kelse
, secretary panetta and the president discussed implementation of our strategy in afghanistan, including consolidation and training afghan security forces, the reduction of u.s. troop levels that the president announced last month and process of transitioning lead security to the afghan government. the president thanked everyone for their service and said that he looked forward to working with them closely as they take up their important positions. >> any discussions about continuing concerns about weakening of the effort? >> not in this meeting. i believe we addressed that issue. the president feels very strongly that because of the success we have had in making progress towards achieving our goals, defeating, disrupting -- dismantle and defeat, reducing the -- stopping the momentum of the taliban and training of afghan security forces, we can begin to draw down our surge forces. 10,000 this year and 30,000 next year. >> has treasury secretary geithner told the president that he would like to leave -- >> not that i'm aware of no. >> i think he will be here for the foreseeable future. [c
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)

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